law enforcement – Morrissey Agency http://morrisseyagency.com/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 03:58:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://morrisseyagency.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg law enforcement – Morrissey Agency http://morrisseyagency.com/ 32 32 Law enforcement struggles to fill positions, with many offering hiring bonuses | News https://morrisseyagency.com/law-enforcement-struggles-to-fill-positions-with-many-offering-hiring-bonuses-news/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 02:24:09 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/law-enforcement-struggles-to-fill-positions-with-many-offering-hiring-bonuses-news/ BUTTE CO., Calif. – Some local law enforcement agencies are now offering signing bonuses to experienced officers. Action News Now has spoken to several law enforcement agencies in our community today, and all say this industry is becoming more and more competitive. The Redding Police Department just announced a $40,000 bonus for lateral hires, meaning […]]]>

BUTTE CO., Calif. – Some local law enforcement agencies are now offering signing bonuses to experienced officers.






Action News Now has spoken to several law enforcement agencies in our community today, and all say this industry is becoming more and more competitive.

The Redding Police Department just announced a $40,000 bonus for lateral hires, meaning officers are currently working for other departments.

They are not alone in this case. The Chico Police Department offers a hiring bonus of $10,000 for officers and $20,000 for dispatch positions. The Orland Police Department is offering a $15,000 hiring bonus.

These types of incentives impact neighboring agencies such as the Tehama County Sheriff’s Office.

“It leads us to become what has often been called a training ground,” said Capt. Dave Kain of the Tehama County Sheriff’s Office. “People who have worked here for several years have developed good experience and good training are then selected by these allied agencies around us who pay a lot more and have less professional responsibilities vis-à-vis their staffing.

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office is concerned about the impact of these bonuses on current employees.

“People who work at the agency who have dedicated many years of serving the citizens of this community, and then you say to someone who is new to the organization, ‘Hey, we’re going to give you a lot of money’ and not compensating the I think existing employees are more of a problem,” said Sheriff Kory Honea of ​​the Butte County Sheriff’s Office.

It is important to note that compensation at these sheriff’s offices is determined by the County Board of Supervisors.

Tehama and Butte counties are conducting salary surveys to determine where his compensation falls on the competitive scale.

Sheriff Honea thinks his staff may be 15-20% behind median pay.

He told Action News Now that he was not opposed to hiring bonuses, but was focused on retaining their skilled and experienced staff.

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office has currently lost 41 positions – 17 deputy sheriffs, 11 correctional non-commissioned officers and five dispatchers. That’s a lot more vacancies than they’ve seen in the past.

Another challenge is that even if they find a new recruit, it is difficult to replace experience.

“We don’t want to lower our standards and bring in people who shouldn’t be in law enforcement, but doing so makes it difficult,” said University Police Chief Chris Nicodemus. State of Chico.

Law enforcement is also seeing fewer young people joining law enforcement these days.

The agencies told Action News Now there was not just one reason, but many. The pandemic has made some people want to continue working from home or retire.

State laws have also changed, keeping some people away. The main reason cited by agencies is the perception of law enforcement officers.

“There has been a continued erosion of respect for the rule of law,” Sheriff Honea said. “There have been past incidents that have put law enforcement under scrutiny, but the problem is when you try to recruit people into a career field and all they hear is negative things about the professional field, they will not be inspired to come and work for us.”

The agencies also told Action News Now that they are beginning to look after the mental and physical health of not just officers, but all of their employees.

Since the campfire, the Butte County Sheriff’s Office has implemented an employee wellness program to help.

Most agencies now also pay for their recruits to go through the Academy, but it takes months.

If there is a failed recruit, the agency has just spent thousands of dollars and has no new recruits to show for.

Sheriff Honea told Action News Now that we may soon see a change in these trends.

“I think communities are getting more and more tired of lawlessness,” Sheriff Honea said. “I think they’re growing weary of the challenges associated with the climate we’re in. Hopefully the pendulum will swing back a bit and people will again appreciate what law enforcement is doing to keep our community safe.”


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Trafficking is seen as an increasing risk; Vulnerable Ukrainian refugees https://morrisseyagency.com/trafficking-is-seen-as-an-increasing-risk-vulnerable-ukrainian-refugees/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 09:25:44 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/trafficking-is-seen-as-an-increasing-risk-vulnerable-ukrainian-refugees/ SIRET, Romania — As millions of women and children cross Ukraine’s borders in the face of Russian aggression, concerns grow over how to protect the most vulnerable refugees from human traffickers or victims of other forms of exploitation. The UN refugee agency says more than 2.5 million people, including more than a million children, have […]]]>

SIRET, Romania — As millions of women and children cross Ukraine’s borders in the face of Russian aggression, concerns grow over how to protect the most vulnerable refugees from human traffickers or victims of other forms of exploitation.

The UN refugee agency says more than 2.5 million people, including more than a million children, have already fled war-torn Ukraine in what has become an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. in Europe and its fastest exodus since the Second World War.

Across Europe, including in the border countries of Romania, Poland, Hungary, Moldova and Slovakia, citizens and volunteers greeted and offered help to those whose lives had been shattered by the war. Many people offer free housing or transport, work opportunities and other forms of assistance, but accepting this comes with risks.

Police in Wroclaw, Poland, said on Thursday they arrested a 49-year-old suspect charged with rape after he was accused of assaulting a 19-year-old Ukrainian refugee he lured with offers of help online. The suspect could face up to 12 years in prison, authorities said.

“He met the girl by offering his help through an internet portal,” police said in a statement. “She escaped from war-torn Ukraine, spoke no Polish. She trusted a man who promised to help and shelter her. Unfortunately, it all turned out to be manipulation misleading.”

Berlin police warned women and children in a social media post in Ukrainian and Russian against accepting offers of overnight stays, urging them to report anything suspicious.

Tamara Barnett, director of operations at the Human Trafficking Foundation, a UK-based charity spun off from the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Human Trafficking, said such rapid and massive movement of people could be a “recipe for a desaster”.

“When you suddenly have a huge cohort of really vulnerable people who need money and assistance immediately,” she said, “that’s kind of fertile ground for situations of exploitation and abuse. sexual exploitation. When I saw all these volunteers offering their homes…that signaled a worry in my head.”

The Migration Data Portal notes that humanitarian crises such as those associated with conflict “can exacerbate pre-existing patterns of trafficking and give rise to new ones” and that traffickers can thrive on “the inability of families and communities to protect themselves and their children”.

Security officials in Romania and Poland told reporters that plainclothes intelligence agents were looking for criminal elements. In the Romanian border town of Siret, authorities said men offering free rides to women had been turned away.

A 2020 report on human trafficking from the European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, estimates that the annual global profit from this crime is around $32 billion. It says sexual exploitation is the most common form of human trafficking in the 27-nation bloc and nearly three-quarters of all victims are women, with nearly one in four victims a child.

Madalina Mocan, committee director of ProTECT, an organization that brings together 21 anti-trafficking groups, said there were “already worrying signs” with some refugees being offered shelter in exchange for services such as cleaning and childcare, which could lead to exploitation.

“There will be attempts by traffickers trying to get victims across the border from Ukraine. Women and children are vulnerable, especially those without relationships — family, friends, other support networks,” she said, adding that the continuation of the conflict means “more and more vulnerable people” reaching the borders.

A large proportion of refugees arriving in border countries want to stay with friends or family elsewhere in Europe, and many rely on foreigners to reach their destination.

“People leaving Ukraine suffer from emotional stress, trauma, fear, confusion,” said Cristina Minculescu, a psychologist at Next Steps Romania who provides support to victims of trafficking. “It’s not just about human trafficking; there is a risk of kidnapping, rape… their vulnerabilities being exploited in different forms.

Ionut Epureanu, the chief commissioner of police in Romania’s Suceava county, told reporters at the Siret border that the police were working closely with the country’s national agency against human trafficking and other authorities. law enforcement agencies to try to prevent crimes.

“We try to do a check for every vehicle leaving the area,” he said. “A hundred people who do transportation have good intentions, but you just have to be one who isn’t…and tragedy can happen.”

Vlad Gheorghe, a Romanian member of the European Parliament who started a Facebook group called United for Ukraine which has more than 250,000 members and pools resources to help refugees, including accommodation, said he worked closely with the authorities to prevent any abuse.

“No offer to volunteer or stay or anything goes out of control; we check every offer,” he said. “We call back, we ask a few questions, we do a minimum check before an offer of help is accepted.”

In the Polish border area of ​​Medyka, seven former members of the French Foreign Legion, an elite military force, voluntarily provide their own security for refugees and are on the lookout for traffickers.

“This morning we found three men trying to get a group of women into a van,” said one of the former legionnaires, a South African named Mornay. “I can’t say 100% that they were trying to recruit them for sex trafficking, but when we started talking to them and approaching them, they got nervous and left immediately.”

“We just want to try to keep women and children safe,” he added. “The risk is very high because there are so many people, you just don’t know who is doing what.”

Information for this article was provided by Renata Brito, Vanessa Gera, Monika Scislowska, Justin Spike, Bela Szandelszky and Florent Bajrami of The Associated Press.


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State police hire company for $1.5 million to clean up agency https://morrisseyagency.com/state-police-hire-company-for-1-5-million-to-clean-up-agency/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 23:43:32 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/state-police-hire-company-for-1-5-million-to-clean-up-agency/ BATON ROUGE — State Police announced late Friday that they have completed a nationwide search and contracted The Bowman Group to conduct a review of its policies, procedures and culture. This comes after more than a year and a half of stories where the state police have been criticized for concealment, lies and concealment of […]]]>

BATON ROUGE — State Police announced late Friday that they have completed a nationwide search and contracted The Bowman Group to conduct a review of its policies, procedures and culture.

This comes after more than a year and a half of stories where the state police have been criticized for concealment, lies and concealment of evidence related to cases they were working on. One in particular is still outstanding regarding the death of Ronald Greene.

The consultancy services will be conducted through May 2023 at a cost of $1.5 million split between this fiscal year and next fiscal year.

The group studies the agency’s operational processes and practices. The state police hope this will lead to improvements in operations, training and administration.

State Police said the Bowman Group will conduct a top-down assessment and provide recommendations and information to share with staff and the public.

The consulting team will provide a detailed law enforcement organizational assessment to cover
key operational and organizational areas to include:
• Community policing/commitment and civil complaints
• Assessment of the Agency’s use of force policies, procedures and protocols
• Crisis intervention (de-escalation)
• Fair and impartial police practices (stops, searches, arrests)
• Organizational culture, leadership and professional development
• Recruitment, hiring, promotion and retention
• Officer welfare and employee assistance and early intervention systems
• Training and academy operations
• Technology, data collection and resources


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Aggressive recruiting, hiring essential for Portland PD to fill vacancies, report says https://morrisseyagency.com/aggressive-recruiting-hiring-essential-for-portland-pd-to-fill-vacancies-report-says/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 15:23:51 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/aggressive-recruiting-hiring-essential-for-portland-pd-to-fill-vacancies-report-says/ By Maxine Bernsteinoregonlive.com PORTLAND, Ore. — So far, Portland police have failed to convince even a retired officer to step back into the force to help close historic personnel shortfalls as they deal with the potential loss of dozens of other officers eligible for retirement in the summer. The shortage should prompt the police bureau […]]]>

By Maxine Bernstein
oregonlive.com

PORTLAND, Ore. — So far, Portland police have failed to convince even a retired officer to step back into the force to help close historic personnel shortfalls as they deal with the potential loss of dozens of other officers eligible for retirement in the summer.

The shortage should prompt the police bureau to move into recruiting immediately, city budget analysts have recommended in a new report.

Police The police are seeking $16.9 million in ongoing funding to increase their 882 authorized sworn officer positions by 67 and add 33 public safety specialists who respond to non-emergency lower-level calls.

Police The police are seeking $16.9 million in ongoing funding to increase their 882 authorized sworn officer positions by 67 and add 33 public safety specialists who respond to non-emergency lower-level calls. (Marc Graves)

Simply adding money for new jobs won’t help, according to analysts who assessed the bureau’s $254 million budget request for the 2022-23 fiscal year.

That compares to the bureau’s $230 million budget for the current fiscal year that runs through the end of June.

Police are seeking $16.9 million in ongoing funding to increase their 882 authorized sworn officer positions by 67 and add 33 public safety specialists who respond to lower-level non-emergency calls.

But budget analysts recommend that the city council instead set aside $2.6 million in one-time general funds to expedite the hiring of 30 officers to fill vacancies.

“Current projections indicate that additional continued funding in fiscal year 2022-23 without significantly increasing hiring rates would not successfully increase the number of officer patrols in the near term,” the report said. ‘to analyse.

“Accelerated and increased hiring of officers is the most significant way to impact officer patrol levels over the next two years.”

Analysts also recommended returning to the general fund the $448,000 the board approved in November to rehire 25 retired officers this year, due to lack of uptake.

[RELATED: What do cops want? More services, better equipment to bolster safety & health]

Rehired retirees were expected to work until the bureau could hire and train new officers, but none signed up.

Given the lack of interest, analysts advised city councilors not to approve the office’s request for another $1.6 million to support the rehire-retire program in the next fiscal year.

The number of sworn police positions filled in the office – 810 out of an authorized strength of 882 – is about 9% below the office’s five-year average, according to the budget office’s report. (The number of positions filled changes frequently. As of Monday, it was 780 sworn members, including 525 at officer rank.)

40 other sworn members of the board are eligible for retirement in July.

Vacancies continued to contribute to slow response times to service calls, according to the report. Fewer officers were available to respond to a record 92 homicides, 1,288 shootings and 63 traffic deaths.

Service calls increased for several years before leveling off at around 260,000 per year from 2018 to 2020. Last year, calls dropped from around 10,000 to 250,914.

Still, it took officers an average of 12 minutes to respond to high-priority emergency calls last year, 4 minutes less than the average response time of 8.2 minutes in 2020, according to the Budget Office.

A city council business meeting is scheduled for Wednesday at 2 p.m. to discuss the police bureau’s budget request and those of other public safety bureaus.

The police bureau is still working to rebuild its recruitment program.

It cut the number of background investigators who check candidates’ personal backgrounds from 18 to 7 in 2020 due to budget cuts. He also lost his three-member recruiting team around the same time when the lead recruiter quit and the other two were placed on patrol to fill shifts.

Police hired no officers in the 2020-21 fiscal year, but hired 24 in the current fiscal year, about three per month between July and Feb. 28.

The office received one-time funding in the fall to support two term-limited positions in the city’s Office of Human Resources to help police recruit sworn officers and civilian police personnel. One position has been filled on a part-time basis and the other remains open.

Two officers are also currently assigned to full-time recruitment, attending job fairs and other events, according to the Budget Office.

sergeant. Trevor Tyler, who was born and raised in Portland and was assigned to the office’s personnel division in September, said he’s looking forward to helping the office get back to full staff.

“It’s not the easiest time to enter this profession, but it could be one of the most important times,” Chief Chuck Lovell said in a recent police bureau podcast. He said he is looking for recruits who want to be part of an evolving police service and who are committed to serving the community.

The bureau requested $418,668 for six administrative specialists to serve as civilian background investigators to initiate the hiring process.

The office must also recruit a diverse pool of officers, budget analysts said, noting that women and people of color made up 18% of sworn officers in the 2020-21 fiscal year, up from 44% the previous year. .

The nationwide law enforcement profession has struggled to find candidates. Portland’s new four-year contract with the police union includes a $5,000 signing bonus and other incentives to attract and retain officers.

The police bureau must also plan for attrition due to early retirements, analysts said.

The next four months will likely see more retirements than usual due to the 27-day pay periods that help boost pension calculations: in July, December 2023, June 2024 and November 2024.

From June 2024, 22% of the office’s current sworn staff will be eligible for retirement, the budget office said.

“While vacancy savings resulting from severances can be used to fund overtime through staff reductions, this is not a financially or operationally sustainable strategy for the officers doing the work,” the analysis says. budgetary.

The bureau is also seeking $3.4 million for 33 other public safety specialists, the unarmed employees who handle low-level business to free up patrol officers to respond to emergencies.

They assist with traffic accidents without injury, attend community events, assist with perimeter traffic at a crime scene, and follow up on property crimes over the phone or in person if necessary. There is no immediate information on the suspect.

Currently, 20 of the 34 certified specialist positions are filled. Vacancies are frozen until an external job evaluation has been completed.

The office is asking to increase the total to 67, but the budget office has recommended that the request be suspended pending the results of the study.

Also in the budget is a request for $694,603 in ongoing funding for six full-time positions to administer records requests and provide technology support for a future body-worn camera program.

The city recently awarded the Bureau of Police $2.6 million to solicit competitive bids for a pilot program.

The body camera program is expected to cost $7.6 million over the next three years, but could be offset by a $1.3 million federal grant. Three-year estimate includes one-time and ongoing costs for hardware, technical support, and staff

©2022 Advance Local Media LLC. Visit oregonlive.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


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Area Police Departments Face Staffing Challenges, Offer New Hiring Incentives | News https://morrisseyagency.com/area-police-departments-face-staffing-challenges-offer-new-hiring-incentives-news/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/area-police-departments-face-staffing-challenges-offer-new-hiring-incentives-news/ The Great Quit — a development that has seen millions of workers resign from their jobs amid a pandemic — is evident across the U.S. economy. But for Alcoa Police Chief David Carswell, the vacancies at his agency are more of a sign than just the effects of the pandemic. The Alcoa Police Department currently […]]]>

The Great Quit — a development that has seen millions of workers resign from their jobs amid a pandemic — is evident across the U.S. economy. But for Alcoa Police Chief David Carswell, the vacancies at his agency are more of a sign than just the effects of the pandemic.

The Alcoa Police Department currently has seven openings for sworn police offices. The vacancies are the result of a mix of retirements and voluntary resignations over the past few years; there were three resignations from the APD in 2019 and two in 2020.

The vacancies, Carswell told the Daily Times, are part of a “perfect storm”. Carswell cited a growing aversion to police work as one of the reasons vacancies have been hard to fill, but also said that, like many other professions, the salary of first responders in general does not has not kept up with economic inflation over time.

“People come in because they’re called to,” Carswell said of his job as a first responder. “Not because it’s going to make them millionaires.”

Recent staffing issues have prompted local, state and national agencies to offer more generous incentives to recruits. Changes to retirement policies and relaxed rules on tattoos are part of what Carswell called “an evolutionary process” of adjusting to a new hiring environment.

Also as part of this process, ODA salaries for new recruits with no prior law enforcement experience have increased in recent months, from $36,900 last year to more than $40,000. $ in 2022.

A few miles further south, Maryville Police Chief Tony Crispy noted that while the MPD is fully staffed at the moment, “recruitment is a challenge.” Like Carswell, Crisp described a marked drop in the number of applications received by the department. He recalled that in the past, the MPD needed to use Maryville High School to meet its recruiting needs. Now the department itself is enough.

Despite recent difficulties, Carswell was adamant that his department would not lower its hiring standards, saying he would “rather keep seven vacancies open for a year than lower our standards” given the importance of first responders to community safety.

He told the Daily Times that he felt there was hope nonetheless.

“There are lights at the end of the tunnel,” he commented, also noting that agencies would continue to adjust their internal policies and recruitment strategies to attract strong candidates.


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WATCH NOW: ‘Proactive’, ‘preventive’ services a priority as referendum to hire extra officers nears | Government and politics https://morrisseyagency.com/watch-now-proactive-preventive-services-a-priority-as-referendum-to-hire-extra-officers-nears-government-and-politics/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/watch-now-proactive-preventive-services-a-priority-as-referendum-to-hire-extra-officers-nears-government-and-politics/ PLEASANT PRAIRIE — Nine years ago, when Police Chief David Smetana walked through the gates of the Roger Prange Civic Center on Highway 31, the site of the Village Police Department, he envisioned a staff of 40 officers patrolling within 33 square miles of the village. But in 2013, when the chief was hired, he […]]]>

PLEASANT PRAIRIE — Nine years ago, when Police Chief David Smetana walked through the gates of the Roger Prange Civic Center on Highway 31, the site of the Village Police Department, he envisioned a staff of 40 officers patrolling within 33 square miles of the village.

But in 2013, when the chief was hired, he had 25 sworn officers on his staff, including himself.

He currently has 36 in the force and is asking for taxpayers’ help to hire four more to maintain services in a community where the population has grown to nearly 22,000, up 10% since his arrival. This population is growing, especially during the day, with the continued development of businesses, commerce, manufacturing and retail in the village.

Over the past decade, the number of calls answered by agents has increased by 7%; and, spread over the last two years, by 12.5%, according to data from the department.

“These are just calls to which officers are called. This ignores self-initiated calls,” he said.

People also read…

In the hands of voters

On April 5, voters will be asked to vote on a $1.6 million referendum that would allow the village to fund the hiring of four additional police officers, as well as 12 fire paramedics, starting in 2023.

If the referendum does not pass, Smetana said the department should review how it delivers services and where it should cut back.

“At this point, our community offers a number of things that other communities don’t,” he said. “We still offer holiday vouchers, we still offer a locking service for your car. With holiday vouchers, residents can call us and say “I’m going on holiday, I’m a snowbird, I’m leaving for three months, can you keep an eye on my residence?” And we will.

The department should take a hard look at how it would redistribute services among existing staff — everything from “proactive” and “preventive” patrols to school resource officers should be reassessed, he said.

“Right now we have four detectives and when I came here (as chief) we had two,” he said. “We have therefore increased the services coming from our investigation office in a more efficient and responsible way, so that each investigator carries a workload. If we were to reinforce patrols and withdraw personnel from our investigation office to do so, it will have an impact on the quality of follow-up and the effectiveness of follow-up is essential in investigations.

On the third shift, for example, the village currently has three officers and, with increasing frequency, calls have involved more than one officer responding to a single incident, such as a traffic stop while intoxicated or a mental health call.

“It’s not optimal because what you’re doing at that point is you don’t have enough patrollers to not only cover your calls for duty, but you’re not able to cover those proactive and preventive things that the patrollers do. ,” he said.

In the Village, if officers notice a garage door being left open or bicycles being left on the lawn unattended for any length of time, they will issue an “oops” card warning owners and helping to prevent thefts , did he declare.

The growth of the community in recent years has led to increased traffic issues, particularly along Highway 50, Highway 94, and other major arteries.

“We need to make sure that these roads and travel areas are given enough attention and the way you do it is proactive traffic enforcement,” he said. “And without additional staff to do the proactive things that we want, services suffer.”

Support indicated in the survey

Smetana is referring to the recent Community Survey of Emergency Services, which includes law enforcement, in which 89% of those who responded said it was important to them to maintain the current level of service.

“These proactive things create this perception that they think their community is also safe,” he said. “We have a school resource program…for three elementary schools and one high school. And that should be assessed if we didn’t have enough staff. I don’t want to remove any of these services.

“But at some point you have to look at what your main responsibility is and I think the people who live in the village appreciate the type of law enforcement and public safety with the firefighters. They see the quality of service they get and they understand it,” he said.

Smetana said that as the head of the community’s law enforcement agency, he takes the responsibility of spending taxpayers’ money “very seriously”.

“I also pay taxes, so I understand what taxpayers are going through. We are extremely responsible when it comes to what we spend money on,” he said. “We have an excellent law enforcement agency that provides excellent service and with the cooperation of taxpayers who see the need for it, we will continue to do so.”


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NIA Tribunal Allows ED to Question Gautam Navlakha in ‘Newsclick’ Case | Bombay News https://morrisseyagency.com/nia-tribunal-allows-ed-to-question-gautam-navlakha-in-newsclick-case-bombay-news/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 12:13:02 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/nia-tribunal-allows-ed-to-question-gautam-navlakha-in-newsclick-case-bombay-news/ Mumbai: A special National Investigation Agency (NIA) tribunal has allowed the Law Enforcement (ED) Directorate to record the statement of human rights activist Gautam Navlakha, accused in the Elgar Parishad case – Maoist link, at Taloja prison from Wednesday to Friday. The agency contacted the Special Court last week with a request to record Navlakha’s […]]]>

Mumbai: A special National Investigation Agency (NIA) tribunal has allowed the Law Enforcement (ED) Directorate to record the statement of human rights activist Gautam Navlakha, accused in the Elgar Parishad case – Maoist link, at Taloja prison from Wednesday to Friday.

The agency contacted the Special Court last week with a request to record Navlakha’s statement under section 50 of the Prevention of Money Laundering Act 2002 (powers of authorities to summons , production of documents and testimony, etc.).

When the court asked the investigative agency if it intended to arrest Navlakha, the agency initially told the court that it just intended to record his statement, but later it clarified that she would arrest Navlakha, if necessary, and could make the decision accordingly. .

The agency told the court that on March 24, 2021, it filed a Law Enforcement Case Information Report (ECIR) against the accused and therefore it was necessary to interview him and record his statement.

After which, NIA Special Judge Dinesh E Kothalikar allowed the Enforcement Branch’s plea.

The court allowed Deputy Warden Rakesh Ranjan Kumar, Deepak Kumar and his team to question Navlakha and record his statement at Taloja prison in the presence of prison authorities from February 23 to 25, 2022.

The judge also ordered the director of Taloja prison to cooperate with the officers and make arrangements.

The agency wants to question Navlakha in its investigation into money laundering against “Newsclick”, a news site.

Following a Delhi Police EOW FIR against Newsclick, the ED registered a money laundering case against the portal in regards to the suspicious foreign funding.

The agency had even raided the website’s offices and properties of its promoters in New Delhi last year in February 2021.

Navlakha is among several activists arrested in connection with Elgar Parishad, a conclave held in Pune on December 31, 2017. Pune police claimed inflammatory speeches at the event sparked violence the following day near the memorial of Koregaon-Bhima war, and the conclave had backed by the Maoists.


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Police departments vary on transparency, according to responses to right-to-know requests https://morrisseyagency.com/police-departments-vary-on-transparency-according-to-responses-to-right-to-know-requests/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 00:25:12 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/police-departments-vary-on-transparency-according-to-responses-to-right-to-know-requests/ Four days after Sandwich Police Department Chief Shawn Varney received a right-to-know request from New Hampshire for 20 years of police records, the city emailed back a 63-page attachment containing information on agent budgets, hiring, and demographics dating back to 2000. Ossipee, a town 19 miles to the southeast, received an identical request at the […]]]>

Four days after Sandwich Police Department Chief Shawn Varney received a right-to-know request from New Hampshire for 20 years of police records, the city emailed back a 63-page attachment containing information on agent budgets, hiring, and demographics dating back to 2000.

Ossipee, a town 19 miles to the southeast, received an identical request at the same time last April. Almost a year later, Police Chief Tony Castaldo continues to ignore the law and has failed to respond.

Over a 10-month period, Ossipee received nearly two dozen copies of a right-to-know request requesting the annual police list and employment records. In addition to the letters, the city received several emails and phone calls. Ossipee, which has twice the population and budget of Sandwich and a 10-member police department, has yet to acknowledge the request through a return email, phone call or written letter. . By law, they had five days to respond.

Finally reached by telephone, an administrative assistant confirmed that he had ignored the request because it was confusing.

These two cities’ responses to the same request illustrate how citizens seeking access to government records under RSA 91-A, New Hampshire’s right-to-know law, may encounter varying levels of access depending on the agency that holds these documents.

Following statewide efforts to increase police transparency, the Tuning Monitor partnered with Granite State News Collaborative last year to collect data from all state law enforcement agencies to document changes in police personnel over the past 20 years.

The idea was to track the growth and diversity of New Hampshire’s police force over two decades.

More than 240 departments across the state have received requests for information on officer budgets, hiring and demographics dating back to 2000. Stories based on the analysis of this data will be released in the coming months. Readers can view all of these requests and departmental responses on MuckRock News, a nonprofit site that helps streamline and track public records requests.

Refusal and radio silence

Some towns, such as Weare, have outright rejected the applications they received.

Weare Police Department administrative assistant Emily Dauphinais wrote in a response letter that the information was exempt from the right to know law because the request would require the department to create new records, which n is not required by law. Calls and emails attempting to clarify which part of the application required new registrations were not returned.

Unlike Weare, other towns have published current and past service listings, payroll records, and hiring records, in addition to years of budget records.

Under the Right to Know Act, a government agency has five business days to respond to requests for public records. However, many police departments required repeated reminders before acknowledging the request, which was sent through MuckRock to keep the process open and transparent to the public.

A dozen departments never acknowledged the requests and did not send records, even after several follow-up emails and phone calls. These departments are in the towns of Hill, Deerfield, Fitzwilliam, Ossipee, Northumberland, Plainfield, Stark, South Hampton, Goshen, Freedom, Stratford and Atkinson. Some departments received the requests at different times than others, but all the requests were sent more than five months ago.

Some requests were lying around on old fax machines or were sent to email addresses of departmental websites that were no longer in use, while other departments said they ignored requests due to confusion over the right-to-know law or cybersecurity concerns.

Ossippee Police Department Secretary Jennifer Benedict confirmed when reached by phone that she had received multiple copies of the request, first sent in April. However, since the request included information from MuckRock about an option to upload responsive documents online as well as send them by mail or email, the department decided to ignore the letter.

“It seemed really sketchy,” Benedict said.

Initially, the Plaistow Police Department also denied the request, saying the requested information was exempt from disclosure under the law. However, the department sent out responsive material after being told this story would be published. “There was a lot of confusion about it,” said police department secretary Brian MacHarrie.

The small town of Canaan in Grafton County ignored emailed requests for months due to an unwillingness to spend staff time searching for records. When reached by phone in October, city administrator Mike Samson said he had no intention of hiding the information, but lacked the manpower to search. employment records dating back 20 years.

” It is a small city. I can’t go back to 2000, and if you want to go to court, I’m happy to explain to the judge that I just don’t have the staff to do it,” Samson said. In January, he provided the To watch with limited information from a lite version of the phone application.

At the discretion of the agencies

Agencies can choose to prioritize in-person document inspection or charge a fee for hard copies, which has created more barriers to collecting this data. The Sugar Hill Police Department charged a $133 fee, while other towns, such as Allenstown, emailed documents for free.

Communities like Portsmouth and Keene have policies that prohibit the emailing of 91-A records, requiring individuals to make in-person visits or pay for copies and postage.

Keene demanded payment to copy 25 pages of records and send a DVD containing electronic copies of those records – or an in-person inspection. The New Hampshire Supreme Court has ruled that policies like Keene’s, which prohibits city staff from sending public documents, do not violate the law.

Keene Deputy Clerk William Dow said if citizens request documents from the clerk’s office informally, instead of filing a 91-A, Dow will simply email the documents to the curious resident. Because of his city’s 91-A policy, he encourages people to request records outside of the formal right-to-know process.

“I try to convince people not to ask that way,” Dow said. “I have the discretion to give it to you.”

While many departments were slow to respond or provided incomplete responses, others made the documents easy to use, even bringing together different records in a more accessible format.

Manchester responded to the request within days and eventually provided annual budgets going back to 2000, annual hiring data going back to 2002 and demographic information from 2020.

Concord also responded within the five-day deadline and sent records a month later containing historical demographic information about the agents. Instead of including records on police spending and staffing, human resources director Jennifer Johnston pointed to the city’s annual budget documents.

New Hampshire State Police initially denied a request for records containing the number of officers employed by the agency, but eventually provided a tally of the number of people sworn in between 1999 and 2021 last month.

“This information is provided outside of 91-A, since we intentionally hand-counted various records to produce these numbers, even though 91-A did not require us to do so,” wrote senior counsel David Hilts. from the security department. an email to To watch.


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New issues are surfacing in the Israeli police surveillance scandal. The IRS is halting its facial recognition plans. The regulatory headwinds are the prevailing winds. https://morrisseyagency.com/new-issues-are-surfacing-in-the-israeli-police-surveillance-scandal-the-irs-is-halting-its-facial-recognition-plans-the-regulatory-headwinds-are-the-prevailing-winds/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 21:27:22 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/new-issues-are-surfacing-in-the-israeli-police-surveillance-scandal-the-irs-is-halting-its-facial-recognition-plans-the-regulatory-headwinds-are-the-prevailing-winds/ In one look. New issues are surfacing in the Israeli police surveillance scandal. The IRS is halting its facial recognition plans. The regulatory headwinds are the prevailing winds. New revelations in the Israeli police surveillance scandal. A new report from the Calcalist, the outlet that originally denounced allegations that Israeli police used NSO Group’s controversial […]]]>

In one look.

  • New issues are surfacing in the Israeli police surveillance scandal.
  • The IRS is halting its facial recognition plans.
  • The regulatory headwinds are the prevailing winds.

New revelations in the Israeli police surveillance scandal.

A new report from the Calcalist, the outlet that originally denounced allegations that Israeli police used NSO Group’s controversial Pegasus surveillance software to spy on Israeli citizens, has added to the growing list of alleged victims, claiming that the spyware had been found on the devices of politicians, chief executives of ministries, businessmen, protest leaders, mayors and journalists. CNN Remarks that while previous allegations focused on police using the spyware without proper authorization, the new allegations highlight how widespread the surveillance was, targeting people who were not suspected of criminal activity.

Hours after the report, Israel’s Public Security Minister Omer Bar Lev announced that he was calling for the creation of a government inquiry commission “to thoroughly investigate the violation of civil rights and their lives. private during the years in question”. Prime Minister Naftali Bennett replied: “This tool and similar tools are important tools in the fight against terrorism and serious crime, but they were not intended for use in phishing campaigns targeting the public or Israeli officials – that’s why we need to understand exactly what happened.” Israel Police Commissioner Kobi Shabtai is pushing for an independent, external judicial review committee to investigate the allegations “in order to restore public confidence in the Israel Police on the one hand and to regulate the use of technologies in the Israel Police on the other.” Ayelet Shaked, who served as Minister of Justice between 2015 and 2019, Recount The Times of Israel, she was unaware that police were using the spyware during her tenure. “It’s unthinkable in a democracy, we’re going to amend the wiretapping law.”

Reuters reports that the alleged targets included several people linked to former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is currently on trial for corruption. The court postponed the proceedings of the trial, dubbed Case 4000, pending more information from the prosecution on the hacking charges. Ha’aretz discuss Netanyahu’s role in Pegasus’ rise to popularity. During his tenure as prime minister, he greased the wheels of the Persian Gulf Pegasus purchase deals and diplomacy, while he was supposedly unaware that his country’s police were using the spyware to target Israeli citizens, and possibly to gather information against him.

IRS halts facial recognition system plans.

After facing bipartisan criticism over privacy concerns, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is backtracking on its plan to use a private facial recognition system to authenticate taxpayer identities for access to online accounts, according to the Wall Street Journal. reports. IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig said, “Everyone should feel comfortable with how their personal information is secured, and we are quickly looking for short-term options that don’t involve recognizing facial”. A company called ID.me had already started providing the identity verification system for people to set up accounts online through the IRS website, and the IRS had announced its intention to require the system. facial recognition for all online accounts this summer. In a letter to Rettig last week, a group of Senate Republicans said the system posed a privacy and cybersecurity threat, explaining, “The IRS has unilaterally decided to allow an outside contractor to act as a gatekeeper between citizens and necessary government services. And yesterday, a group of Democratic lawmakers Published a press release urging the IRS to halt the plans. “Any government agency operating a facial recognition technology system — or contracting with a third party — creates potential risks of privacy breaches and abuse,” they wrote. “We urge the IRS to end this plan and consult with a wide range of stakeholders before deciding on an alternative.” Many privacy experts have expressed concerns about the security risks inherent in using biometric technology for authentication. As Jeramie D. Scott, senior counsel for the Electronic Privacy Information Center, Recount The Washington Post, “Facial recognition technology is based on your face and that’s something you can’t easily change. Once you lose control of it, it’s extremely difficult, if not impossible, to regain control. of your identity.

Lecio DePaula Jr., vice president of data protection at KnowBe4, sees the now-suspended plans as a privacy faux pas:

“Requiring U.S. citizens to submit government-issued identification along with a video for verification on the IRS portal is extremely privacy-intrusive, as this data would then be stored and processed by the third-party contractor – who can use data for a variety of other purposes (potentially sharing with law enforcement). This is one of those cases where the end doesn’t justify the means. The portal can be just as secure by pulling leveraged strong password requirements as well as two-factor authentication for end users, which is a much cheaper, less intrusive and unbiased way to secure the portal without the need for a third party. hope the portal starts moving in the right direction because once one government agency adopts a standard, others start to follow If the United States had a strong privacy law that protected individuals’ biometric information, the situation would be different. However, without any protection of US citizen data, adopting this technology on this scale would be a privacy malpractice.

Tim Erlin, vice president of strategy, at Tripwire, and considers the canceled plans to be ill-conceived and unnecessarily inflammatory:

“Facial recognition technology is polarizing in general, and for many, the idea of ​​the government trusting a third party to handle this personal data is unacceptable. For many others, the concept that the government itself has facial recognition data is equally unacceptable.

“It is clear that there are a number of potential and unresolved issues with the selected supplier. Although the immediate focus is on stopping the process, time must be spent on how a supplier has been selected with all these apparent problems.”

Windy weather forecast for adtech regulations.

Meta, the tech giant formerly known as Facebook, described future hurdles as “regulatory headwinds,” and TechCrunch offers their views on what this vague term means. The company has a long history of using questionable policies to track user activity and turn user data into advertising dollars, and it seems Meta is aware that the regulatory gray areas they benefit from may soon become more black and white. Just last week, the Interactive Advertising Bureau Europe was given two months to revamp the European advertising industry’s flagship tool, the Transparency and Consent Framework (TCF), which has proven to block users with targeted advertisements without proper consent. This is just one indication of the rapidly changing industry privacy regulations that have allowed companies like Meta and Alphabet/Google to get away with simply telling users about ad tracking without asking them. permission. As this digital advertising accounts for 98% of Meta’s revenue and 81% of Alphabet’s, these policies work in their favor, but the changing winds of regulation and transparency could end the era of adtech.


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Crothersville City Council Approves Addition of Fifth Police Officer https://morrisseyagency.com/crothersville-city-council-approves-addition-of-fifth-police-officer/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://morrisseyagency.com/crothersville-city-council-approves-addition-of-fifth-police-officer/ Burnishing CROTHERSVILLE — This spring, two of Crothersville’s police officers will attend the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy in Plainfield. This will leave two more full-time officers and a few reserve officers to patrol the town and respond to calls in the area. Sometimes they may have to travel elsewhere for most of the day to […]]]>

CROTHERSVILLE — This spring, two of Crothersville’s police officers will attend the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy in Plainfield.

This will leave two more full-time officers and a few reserve officers to patrol the town and respond to calls in the area.

Sometimes they may have to travel elsewhere for most of the day to work on a file. Also, if an agent asks for help, other agencies may not be able to help because they are busy or understaffed.

To get through these circumstances, department leaders recently asked the Crothersville City Council to hire a fifth full-time officer.

The board granted that wish, voting 4-0. Councilor Terry Richey was absent.

Deputy Chief Jonathon Tabor said on the days he worked he had the assistance of two reserve officers. When Agent Levi Caudill is working, however, the reservists work full time and are unable to help.

“For him, it’s dangerous. Even in a town like Crothersville, I wouldn’t want to be alone,” Councilman Aaron Mays said.

Tabor said last summer he was alone in a house with an armed and barricaded person for 14 minutes until county officers arrived to help him.

“Fourteen minutes is a long time,” Tabor said.

He also said it was easier to call an outside agency for help with an appeal, but with more in-depth major cases it doesn’t work that way anymore.

“I can call and say, ‘Call me if you need help, but we can’t take this case off you because we’re overbooked,'” Tabor said. “We are not the only ones short of staff. All the other agencies around are understaffed, so everyone’s plates are full.

Tabor said he or Chief Matt Browning might be working on a case involving children and have to spend an entire day in Bloomington, Madison or Indianapolis.

“It gets me out of this town, but I can’t give the case away. For this to work, we need some extra help,” Tabor said.

If they forward calls to other agencies, Browning said people might think Crothersville officers don’t want to do anything about the problem.

“We like to work whatever we can,” he said.

Browning said that in 2021, Crothersville officers answered 1,726 calls and another 930 were taken by officers from the Jackson County Sheriff’s Department, bringing the total to 2,656. To compare, he said that the Brownstown Police Department, which has eight officers and a higher population, received 2,626 calls last year.

The annual number of calls also continues to increase. Browning said in 2012 that Crothersville only answered about 600 calls.

Mays moved a motion to approve the hiring of a fifth police officer, but council vice-chairman Jamy Greathouse suggested holding an executive session so the council, Tabor and Browning could meet to s make sure it’s within the city’s budget and that the department is ready to begin the hiring process. .

Then it could be presented to the board at the March meeting to consider approval.

“We’ve had this conversation several times,” Greathouse said of adding a fifth officer. “The problem is that it’s not about knowing that they need it. It’s a question of how you go about it. »

A few years ago, the department had three officers and the board approved increasing it to four with the goal of making it five at some point.

“The PD has come a long way with compensation and staffing and equipment and all those sorts of things, but there’s a lot more to it than just saying, ‘Let’s hire,'” Greathouse said. “I agree 100% that we need to hire. We could use another officer, there’s no doubt in my mind. I just want to make sure we have all our ducks in a row to put another person in there like that.

Clerk-Treasurer Danieta Foster said adding a fifth officer would require a resolution for additional appropriation, but it remains within the city budget.

Browning said he has requests on file, and Greathouse said Browning could start going through them while the board and Foster meet to make sure everything is lined up on their side.

Councilman Chad Wilson then seconded Mays’ motion, and it passed.


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